Sideshow: Biden shares some marriage advice

Posted by admin | Posted in Politics | Posted on 31-05-2013-05-2008

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Guess who’s back (back again)?

Posted by admin | Posted in Politics | Posted on 31-05-2013-05-2008

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As economy improves, so will the political climate

Posted by admin | Posted in Politics | Posted on 31-05-2013-05-2008

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Female breadwinners study infuriates right-wing

Posted by admin | Posted in Politics | Posted on 31-05-2013-05-2008

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Scandal-obsessed GOP ignores economic recovery

Posted by admin | Posted in Politics | Posted on 31-05-2013-05-2008

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The GOP’s habit of employing ‘bait and switch’ tactics

Posted by admin | Posted in Politics | Posted on 31-05-2013-05-2008

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More good news for the GOP: Americans increasingly say they feel the pain from sequester

Posted by admin | Posted in Politics | Posted on 31-05-2013-05-2008

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Data: ABC News/Washington Post poll

Sequester pain is spreading, according to the latest ABC News/Washington Post poll:

An ABC News/Washington Post poll in May found that 37 percent of Americans say they’ve been negatively affected, up from 25 percent in March. And 18 percent say they’ve felt a “major impact.”

Not surprisingly, those most affected by the cuts are sharply opposed to sequestration. About 80 percent of those who say they’ve felt a “major impact” oppose the budget cuts.  (The public as a whole opposes the cuts by a 56 percent to 35 percent margin.)

Of course, Congress isn’t paying any attention to the fact that a clear and growing majority of Americans think the sequester is bad policy and should be eliminated. In fact, along with Benghazirama, Republicans are claiming it as their biggest accomplishment. Maybe that’s why the GOP has “achieved” a record low approval rating in national polling?

Jeb laughs off ‘totally liberated’ mother’s remark about too many Bushes

Posted by admin | Posted in Politics | Posted on 31-05-2013-05-2008

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U.S. President George W. Bush (R) and his brother, Florida Governor Jeb Bush, REUTERS/Jim Young

2016: Bush-Clinton, Pt. 2?

When Barbara Bush said this about the possibility of her son Jeb Bush running for president in 2016 …

We’ve had enough Bushes.

… you couldn’t dispute her words, but also couldn’t help but think she wasn’t entirely sincere. Whatever the case, apparently Jeb didn’t take her seriously:

“What can I tell you? All I can say is we all have mothers, right?” he said as hundreds of listeners laughed and applauded.

“She is totally liberated, and God bless her.”

As for whether he’ll run?

“My thinking is not to think about it for a year,” he said. “Life teaches you that you need to make decisions in the right time – not too early, not too late. … I’ll check in maybe a year from now, 15 months from now, something like that.”

Who knows if he’ll run, but if Ted Cruz is still the GOP superstar that he is today, you can take it to the bank that Bush will face a ton of pressure from D.C. Republicans to get in the race. Because without a heavyweight establishment figure like Bush in the race, Cruz—or some other certifiable loon—could easily be the favorite winning the nomination. The thing is, as we saw with Mitt Romney, it doesn’t matter what Bush’s reputation is at the beginning of the primary: By the time it’s over, he’ll be as loopy as Cruz.

GOP ready to leave off Obamacare repeal and start on defunding

Posted by admin | Posted in Politics | Posted on 31-05-2013-05-2008

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Paper printed with "healthcare" in a shredder

When the 37th time repealing Obamacare proved not to be the charm, the Right might just be giving up on that one. Those votes have been purely symbolic anyway, but have opened up the GOP to no small amount of criticism and ridicule. It wouldn’t be safe to take bets on the House never having another repeal vote (they are addicts, after all) but they’ve got a more effective way of killing the law: starving it for funds. And they’ll do it with their favorite hostage, the debt ceiling.

Heritage Action for America, the advocacy arm of the Heritage Foundation, and the Tea Party-aligned group FreedomWorks will push Congress to cut off funding for the exchanges in the debate later this year over raising the debt ceiling, the Washington-based groups said. The chairman of the advocacy group Restore America’s Voice, Ken Hoagland, said he plans to warn people through advertising about the “dysfunctional” exchanges.

While opposition to the health-care program is nothing new, the tactics are changing. Rather than focusing on repealing the law in Congress and the courts, two avenues that have failed so far, the groups are aiming to prevent the cornerstone of the legislation, the insurance exchanges, from succeeding. Their goal is to limit enrollments, drive up costs, and make it easier to roll back all or part of the law later.

From the beginning, it’s been clear that if the law’s opponents could stop the law, they’d do everything in their power to sabotage it. That’s why so many Republican governors and legislatures have refused to set up exchanges in their own states, or expand Medicaid. The fear is that if the law works, if people get affordable health insurance and get used it and use it and like it, it’s disaster for opponents. The exchanges are the key to that. The mandate requires people buy insurance, and the exchange is how they’ll do that. And the exchanges need to be well populated with healthy people.

And Republicans are going to do everything in their power to make all that not happen.

The Week Ahead: China, IRS, and voting in Mo., N.J.

Posted by admin | Posted in Politics | Posted on 31-05-2013-05-2008

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